Mythic Heroes/023SG

There are infinite alternate universes – altiverses – in the multiversal construct called Ninespace. One such altiverse is tagged 023SG by the Sentinubal that tracks and protects Ninespace. Like many of the altiverses, there is a planet called Earth in 023SG, and like a smaller but still significant number of those altiverses, there are people with special powers and abilities on 023SG who fight to make a difference… or fight to make the world their own.

These enhanced beings — mystery men, heroes, metahumans, super guys and gals, call them what you will — first began to appear in the 1920s. At first, they were — mostly — normal human beings with the discipline, intellect, will, and gumption to make a difference while hiding behind a mask or wearing outlandish clothing. People like the Golden Swashbuckler, Spycracker, Solitaire, Six-Gun Sam and the All-American Lad protected their homes, against crime… and as the 1940s dawned, against the enemies of Freedom.

But there is a universal constant in 023SG… as there are in so many of the altiverses like it. As time passes, entropy increases… and so does absurdity. And as the first enhanced humans began to appear, absurdity rose with them. World War II saw the first surge in the metahuman population, and those metahumans put their new powers on the lines to fight in the war, and fight for what they believed in. Heroes like the aquakinetic Wave, the explosive Lieutenant Blockbuster, and the blur known as the Quick fired the imagination as quickly as they took down their enemies.

And then… as the 50’s passed… those heroes seemed to fade away.

But absurdity always increases. And as the world becomes more absurd, so too do the days of super guys, super gals, and super gender-nonspecific-folks return. And if the world is stranger… well, that comes from absurdity as well. It all started in Unfortunance City, Rhode Island, when an Elder God from the depths of Florid Poetry stood up from the waters, and a shining beacon of hope appeared, gleaming with golden scales, to oppose it and inaugurate the Age of Heroic Intent.

That said shining beacon of hope was a fish seems beside the point, really. But then, absurdity always increases.

The Home Front

Stories of the Mystery Men who
came before, and the first generation
of heroes who followed them

  • My White Plume: The story of the Golden Swashbuckler — the very first mystery man who had also been the last mystery man — and the last act of his heroic career.
  • Spycracker and Torpedo: An interview with Torpedo — the former junior partner of the tireless defender of freedom called Spycracker — and their greatest triumph! But stories don’t end after victories, do they?
  • Diamond in the Rough: Not everyone who fought to protect the home front was male. And not everyone who fought to protect the home front was white. This is the story of Ellen Nakimota, the Japanese-American girl who suited up as Diamond — the junior partner of the female ‘mystery man’ ironically called Solitaire. This is also the story of the Liberty Brigade which brought the Mystery Men together for a good cause, and how Ellen Nakimota learned the difference between being a hero in 1944… and being Asian in 1944.
  • HomecomingOngoing: The age of mystery men rose in the twenties but came to its zenith in World War II… but as tireless and brave as the mystery men were, they could hardly compete with people who could blow up tanks with a gesture or swamp battleships with waves, at least in the eyes of the public. But for Len Davis — the All-American Lad — the end of the war didn’t mean the end of protecting his city. But when the high flying human tank called Lieutenant Blockbuster came home to his city as well… was there even a place for the All-American Lad? And could the Lad even compete, when the crooks could suddenly lift cars and didn’t even notice bullets?

Project Corrigendum

Stories of the reclassification
of heroes from active figures
to mythic ones… by any means necessary

  • Soon to come, we hope!

The Age
of
Heroic Intent

Metahumanity had been closeted
for decades — the province of comic books,
movies, and documentaries.
But absurdity always increases.
This is the age of good versus evil.
It’s unreasonable to expect it to always make sense.

  • The Goldfish: The first of the heroes of the Age of Heroic Intent. Mystic paragon of virtue. And a fish. Did we mention she’s a fish? Also the story of Max Santiago, who brought her into existence completely by accident, which depressingly is the smartest thing he’s done to date.

 

Lovelace½

Part One complete! Part Two ongoing!

Andrea Gannett-Moore was almost never called that. Her friends and almost everyone else called her ‘Andi’ unless she were in trouble, and since traveling across an ocean to attend Brooks-Carillon Academy in Brunswick, Maine in the United States. The London born Andi was used to boarding schools, of course — she had been in them essentially all her life, rarely if ever seeing her parents. And, every time she was moved to a new school, she was sent further and further away from London.

Now 15 years old and near the end of her Freshman year, Andi was a decent enough student academically and a dedicated student athlete, though in the Spring she had to give cricket up for lacrosse. She had friends, teased boys (and everyone else), and generally got by, save in Algebra where she struggled at best.

And then one day Andi Gannett-Moore walked into an Algebra test convinced she would fail, and wrote down the right answers as fast as she could scribble, without even really noticing that was what she was doing.

Suddenly able to recall every instant of her life from three years old on, identify patterns, process maths and mysteries, learn languages and dialects almost instantly, interpret literature and draw inferences… Andi found herself accused of cheating and lying until it became clear that no — somehow she had become not just the smartest student at Brooks-Carillon Academy, but possibly the smartest human being alive.

Now, Andi had to figure out what was happening to her — and meeting the Texan Queen of a kingdom in the land of dreams made it clear that the world was a much stranger… and more sinister… place than she could have imagined. A world where wars were sometimes fought in the shadows… and Andi herself had been made as a weapon in that war.

Now, with her family exposed as part of something far more sinister and those adults at Brooks-Carillon Academy who cared the most about Andi almost certainly dead, Andi has gone on the run — looking for answers and sanctuary — and sworn that whatever made her would never reap the benefits, even if that meant her own death.

All in all, she is very cross.

Interviewing Trey

Story in Progress! In this sequel to Interviewing Leather, rock journalist Todd Chapman has become better known for being a supervillain (and superhero) journalist. After the successful publication of his article “Interviewing Leather” in Amplifer magazine, Chapman traveled the country, talking to third and fourth tier villains and the heroes associated with them — the results becoming his book Low Society, which has given him some notoriety and opportunities.

Those opportunities turn dark when his interview subject is murdered and he is kidnapped by the first tier supervillain — and murderously insane — Jack O’Knaves. The Jack claims he wants a book written, and he’s beyond willing to kill to get it. Foisted on one of the Jack’s assistants — a Hench and ex-dancer called Trey, for the Three of Hearts — Chapman finds himself deep within the illicit Dispater’s Casino. Caught between the opportunity to learn how a psychopathic showman can afford all his tricks and traps… the chance to learn why men and women are willing to serve him unto death, and the razor-thin tightrope of survival, Chapman has never followed a more important story.

First Drafts are posted on Patreon – Second Drafts are posted here on Banter Latte!

Interviewing Leather

Complete Story! This is the story of Todd Chapman, a somewhat burned out writer for Amplifier magazine in a world where caped heroes fight dastardly villains on an everyday basis. His editor has gotten a chance to land an interview with a third string supervillain named Leather — a perfect subject for a rock magazine. She’s edgy, attractive in a punk rock/Suicidegirls kind of way, camera friendly and an intriguing subject. Todd’s the guy who drew the assignment.

Todd gets a look into the world of supervillains from the inside — how exactly does crime pay? Where do the henchmen come from? How do villains travel from one city to another? Why would someone decide to become a supervillain in the first place? In the process, he learns something about what goes into a C-List Supervillain… and maybe what goes into a midlist music reporter, too.


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